Architect Jaquelin Taylor Robertson, also known for being New York’s most impassioned advocates of urban design died on 9 May, Saturday.

Anya Robertson, his wife, spoke of his untimely death caused by Alzheimer’s disease. He peacefully passed at their home in East Hampton, New York. The prominent urbanist and classical architectural fanatic was 88 at the time of his death.

Robertson’s early life

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Architect Jaquelin Taylor Robertson (Photo Courtesy: Cooper Robertson and Partners)

He was born and raised on a classical estate in Richmond, Virginia on March 20, 1933. His graduation from Yale University tool place in 1955, and he was a Rhodes Scholar Oxford’s Magdalen College for two years.

He earned a master’s degree from Oxford’s school of architecture in 1961. He began his career as an architect by working for Edward Larrabee Barnes.

His career

While serving as the dean at the University of Virginia’s architecture school; he established a practice along with Peter Eisenman.

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Architect Jaquelin Taylor Robertson (Photo Courtesy: Cooper Robertson and Partners)

In 1988, he founded the Cooper Robertson and Partners, along with Alexander Cooper. The firm now goes by Cooper Robertson.

He played a vital role in several huge projects such as the design of Celebration, Fla., and portions of New Albany, Ohio. WaterColor, a Disney development and the retail mogul Leslie Wexner’s suburban community outside Columbus are also by him.

Some of his most prominent clients include; Ahmet Ertegun, the record producer; and  Alfred Taubman, the owner of Sotheby’s; Don Hewitt, the CBS News producer; Henry Kravis and Leon Black, the financiers; Marshall Rose, the New York developer.

In 1991, he was the recipient of a national design award from the American Institute of Architects. He made history for the first firm to receive national awards for architecture and urban design in the same year.

In 1998, he was the recipient of the Thomas Jefferson Medal in Architecture and in 2007, the Driehaus Prize.

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